Friedrich Nietzsche – “On Corrupting Youth”

The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher regard those who think alike than those who think differently.

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900)

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Mimi R. Gladstein – “Feminism and Equal Opportunity: Hermione and the Women of Hogwarts”

Women in the enchanted and enchanting world of Harry Potter are anything but second-class citizens.

(from Harry Potter and Philosophy edited by David Bagget and Shawn E. Klein)

Key points on Hermione

  1. Hard Work
  2. Logic
  3. Knowledge
  4. Rational

Sources

  • John Stuart Mill, On Liberty and On the Subjection of Women
  • Ludwig Wittgenstein, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus

Harald Thorsrud – “Voldemort’s Agents, Malfoy’s Cronies, and Hagrid’s Chums: Friendship in Harry Potter”

One of the surest signs of friendship is the willingness to help out in bad times.

(from Harry Potter and Philosophy edited by David Bagget and Shawn E. Klein)

Key points:

Three types of friendship:

  1. Useful Friends
  2. Pleasant Friends
  3. Admirable Friends

Sources in article

  • Michael Pakaluk , Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics, Books VIII and IX
  • Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

Diana Mertz Hsieh – “Dursley Duplicity: The Morality and Psychology of Self-Deception”

Honesty and persistence in the pursuit of knowledge has long been a central moral idea of Western philosophy.

(from Harry Potter and Philosophy edited by David Bagget and Shawn E. Klein)

Key Lessons on Self-deception:

  1. Self-deception cannot insulate a person from disturbing reminders of the truth.
  2. Self-deception often will spread beyond the original denial to related issues.
  3. Self-deception easily becomes a habitual method of avoiding painful truths.

Books in this paper

  • David Nyberg, The Varnished Truth: Truth Telling and Deceiving in Ordinary Life
  • Robert Solomon, What a Tangled Web: Deception and Self-Deception in Philosophy
  • David Goleman, Vital Lies, Simple Truths

Tom Morris – “The Courageous Harry Potter”

Harry Potter is certainly one of the most popular characters in the world

(from Harry Potter and Philosophy edited by David Bagget and Shawn E. Klein)

Take away:

Harry Potter’s Recipe for Courage

  1. Prepare for the challenge
  2. Surround yourself with support
  3. Engage in positive self-talk
  4. Focus on what’s at stake
  5. Take appropriate action

Cited philosophers, books

  • Søren Kierkegaard – “”Concluding Unscientific Postscript”

N.B. I made a typo in the author’s first name. Tom and not Tim! All apologies.